Living With Limitations:

Adonis amurensis and Hellebore x Garden Hybrid white

Toxic Relationships

 

Observation

This story goes back 3 to 4 years. Each spring I am reminded of its progress, but do what most gardeners do: procrastinate. I was vaguely aware of the situation, but only gave it a nod. Making a mental note that went something like “I really should do something about that” and moving on. After all, the relationship was only in the beginning stages and there were reasons not to disturb its growth as yet.

Growing

I was fortunate in locating and purchasing an Adonis amurensis ‘Chichibu Beni’ that had long been at the top of my up-front list, and without having to take out a second mortgage.  Adonis with their fern to feathery foliage in bright spring-green topped by saucer-like petals in yellow-orange with a hint of tan are set off by the yellow stamens in the center. What is not to lust after?

To the best of my knowledge this cultivar can only be propagated by division and they are not fast growers.  This not only means a high purchase price, but also you know the start will be small when received. I was tempted to name it “My Precious” when it arrived for transplanting.

In anticipation of My Precious’ arrival I had prepared a raised bed next to a mature white blooming hellebore. Several other Japanese woodlanders included in the order would play companion. The first year it emerged, but if I had not known where it was

located I would not have noticed the small sprout of green that quickly went dormant. The next year there was one bloom and it was small. The third year still only one bloom but overall the plant was larger and more robust. It also had a seedling hellebore that had germinated in the space intended for the Adonis. I did not want to disturb the Adonis roots so soon after transplanting so I let the relationship remain. The fourth year I saw a toxic relationship developing. The more assertive and robust hellebore was in the root system of the Adonis. They may have been a pretty couple together, but a gardener could see where this relationship would end up.

Separation

The Adonis may have been quite lovely to look at and seemingly quite delicate with its feathery foliage, but it was, once established, a perennial that could hold its own in the garden. However, the hellebore was an exceptional plant selected for its size and vigor. It was far too much for My Precious not to lose itself in the relationship and eventually fade away with its space and nutrients take up by the hellebore. If they were to

Helleborus thibetanus, Thibetan Hellebore buds emerging

flourish they will have to be separated and this year is the optimal time. The hellebore will become a gift to a gardener, and the Adonis, once dormant, will find a home with its own species in another bed. Its new companions will be yellow –blooming Adonis, snowdrops and a species hellebore H. tibetanus. All will grow together, go dormant together, with space to look and preform at their best without the threat of smothering.

In the 1970’s everyone was discovering the concept of personal space and their need of their space in a relationship. Looks like that still applies not only to both gardeners but their plants as well.

 

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