Living With Limitations: Redesign Part 2

Lilium henryi with Delphinium exaltatum

Dead Witch-Hazel

The more I pause in front of the now deceased witch-hazel serving as midway marker for the long narrow bed, the more ways I come up with to enhance its decaying days. I previously set a clay container at its base with a species clematis to scramble up the leafless limbs. The clematis has small urn-shaped flowers of satin purple-blue-violet, but is not all that showy. However, I do enjoy its quiet presence and vigor, so it gets to remain until the tree makes a final exit.

I do not want to duplicate the first half of the bed, but will extend my theme, continuing the second half of my new design. Next to the witch-hazel I have transplanted a half dozen Lilium henryi bulbs.  The Turk’s cap style reflexed orange petals peppered with brown freckles has dark orange pollen extending well past the petals on arching filaments. In the next year or two the lilies will reach four feet or more having flowers among the lower branches of the witch-hazel in late July and early August.

Standing in front of the what-was-once Lilium henryi I see where mom deer fed her two Disneyesque spotted young last evening or early this morning. The lilies certainly will not be reaching past four six inches this year, much less four feet. After I finished mumbling under my breath, I remembered a couple of small birdhouses; one a wren house and one a hummingbird home. I hung those in the branches and then thought of some color I could use complementing the birdhouses. I had two gifts of glass; one a sheet of various shades of green resembling a small stained glass window, the other a globe in blue and green to twist and turn casting rays of color. Next up is to watch yard sales for more and larger birdhouses.

 

Weigela Midnight Wine was transplanted next to the Lilium. I am now considering purchasing one, perhaps two more, to form a ground cover of dark burgundy-purple foliage providing contrast to the orange lilies. This small shrub only reaches ten to twelve inches in height and one and half to two feet in spread. Midnight Wine does bloom in spring, but if and when it does they are sporadic and few, which is ok with me for I am interested in the colorful leaves.

 

Barberry Sunjoy Gold Pillar brings the color bright gold to contrast with the burgundy of the Weigela. It is transplanted four feet from the Weigela, bringing contrast in height and form. Weigela is a small mound, while Gold Pillar is upright reaching a height of four feet. New grow begins orange-red and matures into vivid gold. Come autumn foliage shifts to orange-red. This is another shrub mother deer will not be bringing her does to dine upon.

 

Hydrangea Tough Stuff Ah-Ha
Proven Winners Photo

Hydrangea Tuff Stuff Ah Ha is a lacecap style blooming shrub reblooming all summer in blue or pink double florets. Not only does it rebloom, but those blooms are numerous and large as saucers at the end of each stout stem. I also happen to like the deep green, substantial leaves with their quilted appearance, prominent veins and jagged edges. Height is about three feet and spread is about the same for a very neat, compact, appearance. I am noticing a shift from blue to pink blooms as the season progresses telling me to use and acidic fertilizer next spring if I want to see blue blooms.

 

Plectranthus effusus var. longitubus (Isodon effusus) is a mouthful and the name has been changed three times since I first became aware of this woody perennial. When first transplanted it was the Tubesock plant, and remains that way in my mind. The plant gets its name from the flowers which are long and tube-like in shape but small and dainty: multiple little icy blue tubesocks on wiry stems reaching an airy three feet. I think they look better when cut back in July for forming a thicker, shorter plant. Anyway, sure forms a definite contrast to its neighbor the hydrangea. Blooms are in late summer.

 

Viburnum Lil Ditty from Proven Winners

Viburnum Little Ditty reaches only one to two feet in height with the same spread making for one of the most versatile viburnums on the market. It is just about maintenance free for it grows into a mound, needing no trimming, nipping or deadheading. The glossy green leaves are topped by creamy white little clouds resting just above the foliage and there are an abundance of those little clouds that also happen to be fragrant. A step down from the height of the Tubesock, a contrast of stout against airy and early blooms as opposed to late.

 

Calycanthus Burgundy Spice sits directly behind the Little Ditty so the white of the blooms and waxed green of the viburnum can help bring out the burgundy of the foliage of the Burgundy Spice (not that it needs help). Here is a shrub to die for; deep burgundy crinkled foliage that emerges burgundy, stays that color until dropping in the fall. Blooms are abundant and also in burgundy. The spicy fragrant flowers are an excuse to take a glass of wine into the garden on afternoons when the aroma is best. Height about eight feet and width six feet.

 

Next up: Section three.