Living With Limitations:

Aralia cordata Gotemba
Photo Monrovia

 

Just a Bit More

Over my thirty-plus years of gardening there has been plants that continued to hold a special place on my Lust-List. I would chase one down, make a purchase and transplant it to my garden, mark it from the list and then find myself adding it back to the list. Sometimes I simply eliminated the plant from my list, making the decision there was no need to kill another. Another special plant would give me one or two good years and then decline until one spring I went out and found the plant was no longer with me. Some did not make it that far: I was growing more frustration than perennials.

Just a Bit More Effort

Over time many of the “problem plants” began to fall into a category in my mind. As usual it was the gardener who was the problem, and not the perennial. Almost all reached back to the most basic of garden rules of: locate a plant where it needs to be and not necessarily where you want it. When reading descriptions and individual plant needs for a particular plant on my Lust-List I was remembering what I wanted to remember on plant needs. If a plant description of needs said something like “Appreciates consistent extra moisture, but will perform without it” guess which part remained in my mind. Yep, “will perform without extra moisture.” Perhaps in some gardens, but mostly not so much in my garden.

Special Project

Aralia cordata Gotemba fruit
Monrovia photo

The plants that I now had notations beside in my Lust-List became a future special project.  My “technical difficulties” in health caused the project to put but on hold for I could no longer do the carrying and digging. Then along came a volunteer who wanted to give me a hand with the project. With his assistance, (well, actually he did all the manual labor), supplies and tools were carried into the garden, stones moved forming an overall outline, bags became layers to mix.

The new bed is at the junction of two paths, roughly teardrop in shape, and is the tip of a larger bed, all outlined by aged stones with the appearance of being nibbled and bored by rock worms. It is located on the north side of a hill and has sun/shade mix with sun traveling across the bed. A base of mixed coarse sand and granite grit mixed with native soil was layered with a bag of unmilled sphagnum peat and mixed. Then two bags of peat moss that were mixed with the previous, followed by bags of pine bark mulch and more peat. All received a final mixing until it filled up the inside of the stones raising above soil level. I wanted an area holding extra consistent moisture, but not a soupy bog. Then a bit of patience waiting for it all to be rained upon and settled.

The Plants

I have decided to go for drama in this bed since there are so many choices available in foliage textures and colors as well as blooms. My overall concept is for a primary play of foliage. Assembling my special plants for this special bed the first thing I realized was I had more plants than space.

Aralia cordata “Gotemba” is a large herbaceous perennial that resembles a shrub dying back to the ground each winter. If I transplanted it to the new bed and it reached full potential of 5 feet across and 8 feet tall not much space would remain for my other beauties. To solve that one I dug a hole, mixed soil well with peat, compost, and soil conditioner locating the golden foliage showpiece outside the bed at the tip of the tear. If it only reached half its potential in height and width I will be content.

The bed is 5 feet at widest point by 9 feet length:  what would you transplant next if it were in your garden?

I have completed my new bed, but want to hear your choice.  Next blog I will describe the plants I used.