Living With Limitations: An Exotic Tropical Garden

Zimgiber mioga bloom. Hardy Ginger

An Exotic Tropical Garden

One would think standing in a mid-west garden during the middle of a drought would not bring images of the tropics immediately to mind. However, I discovered plants that had me ordering a safari jacket and shorts in kaki, my very own pith helmet, while in the background drums of Jumanji changed the rhythm of my heart.

Standing crane Variegated Hardy Ginger foliage

My original discovery took place during a trip to the greenhouse jungles of Brian’s Botanicals  a few years back. During checkout he remembered one more plant I absolutely could not go home without and disappeared back into the greenhouses. I was gifted with a start of Zingiber mioga ‘Dancing Crane’, also known as Dancing Crane variegated Ginger. I can no longer remember the other plants I purchased that day, but the gifted ginger thrives in my garden.

At first I was reluctant to transplant it into my garden due to hardiness concerns, but those concerns would prove to be unfounded. A Zone rating of 6 has been established and I have seen a report of success in Zone 5 (Kansas City).

While Zingiber enjoy consistent moisture, it is not an absolute: in fact, I find they are somewhat tolerant of drought. I did find my original transplant reached a height of just under three feet, while offsets I moved to a spot with more moisture are close to five feet. I now have three trials growing: one of a species, two cultivars, in four locations and all are doing just fine.

My first hardy ginger from Brian has great green foliage with margins and feathered centers of white resembling streaks of lightning strikes. It does not have the heft nor the width of the other cultivars I am growing while it does have the height, so it appears more graceful. Rhizomes are short so it is a tight clump-forming colony.

Zingiber mioga Krug’s Zing

My next two Zingiber came from Far Reaches Farm: the species and a cultivar selected by Krug Farms, ‘Krug’s Zing’. The species are from Japan and the cultivar from Korea. Foliage is five feet tall in my garden, almost two feet across, and individual leaves are alternate up the main stem, pointing out and up, reaching fourteen inches in length. There is plenty of space between each leaf. Krug’s Zing has a more open growth habit, blooms of yellow and lilac-pink. Both Dancing Crane and the species have flowers with buds of lemon yellow opening to fleshy cream. All three bloom at ground level with orchid-like petals flowing between the tall stalks of tropical like foliage. The blooms appear during September well into October, individual flowers fleeting.

When selecting companions care will be needed to avoid a ground cover that would hide the ground level blooms. Throw in the largest ferns you can find, a decaying log, Toad-Lilies (Tricyrtis) and leave space for porters to set up tents for tea promptly at four.