Living With Limitations: Impatient

Little green noses of Snowdrops (Galanthus) emerging

Impatient

I keep telling myself it is far better to be patient than to become a patient. There is also the one saying it is easier to practice tranquility as a monk than when up to your unmentionables in alligators. All to say, being a gardener in the middle of winter in the mid-West can certainly tax one’s patience.

Here I am going into the second week of January and I have been ready for spring since opening my last gift at Christmas. At New Year’s celebration I had more than one glass of wine, so was not caring about spring’s arrival. I had almost, but not quiet, accepted that it was winter, just relax and think about something else like putting my tax information in order.

Walking Fern

Temptation in a Text

Then it happened. A gardening buddy located further south sent me a text with multiple photos of plants in bud, green foliage and real blooms. My toenails turned warm, my heart skipped a beat, then speeded up. The pupils in my eyes opened to the max. I wiped the drool from the screen of my cell phone, pushed down my sense of envy and returned with a polite thank you. Now he had done it. All reservations were off, my calm acceptance of 2 more months of winter flew out the window along with any tranquility I may have had. I laced up my boots, put on coat and hat and headed for my hillside garden. It is on the north side of a hill so

Foliage and buds of Helleborus foetidus

I know it is a bit later than other gardens, but I had to find something to calm my cravings.

Green is a Color

If one accepts the premise of green is a color, then my garden is not looking too shabby. I have some conifers, but not near enough. There are creeping evergreen shrubs such as Creeping Wintergreen (Gaultheria procumbens), Partridge berry (Mitchella repens), Sweetbox, (Sarcococca hookerana var humilis) and several Epimediums to name but a few. In perennials there are Evergreen Solomon’s Seal (Disporopsis pernyi), Hellebore hybrids and species (Helleborus) throughout the garden, and new, fresh, bright green crinkly green leaves of Primula with plump buds in the middle. Several locations of Hardy Cyclamen (Cyclamen hederifolium) with silver and green foliage, and of course, the arrowhead-shaped variegated green leaves of Black Calla (Arum italicum).

Probably only a gardener could get excited over one inch, plump blades, of emerging green noses of Snowdrops (Galanthus), or the knobby knees of Adonis pushing through the mulch.

Remiss

I would be seriously remiss if I did not include ferns such as our native Christmas fern (Polystichum acrostichoides), our Walking Fern (Camptosorus rhizophyllus), the Tassel fern (Polystichum polyblepharum) and Autumn fern (Dryopteris erythrosora). If it is a shade garden then the different species of moss must be mentioned. We have had a wet winter and mosses have never looked more fresh and bright.

We Want Blooms

I see and I am appreciative of my January garden and the days that we have clear skies and temperatures agreeable to a pleasant stroll. I am certainly glad that I remembered to transplant the delayed gratification of plants rewarding my efforts with color in the bleak winter months. Green is good. Some of the green shifts to bronze, red, copper, and darker shades to absorb the winter rays, adding to the reason for a walk.

But, having sang the praises of the color green, the wonders of colorful foliage, we all know gardeners will not be truly happy, never satisfied, unto we see the first plump bud unfold signaling the beginning of another gardening season.

We want blooms! We want blooms! We want blooms!

 

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